The Curators Exhibition Award sponsors exhibitions of California artists proposed by one or more California curator(s) to be held in major museums and other art venues by underwriting the cost of the exhibitions, scholarly catalogues and other documentation. Through this endeavor FOCA has established an impressive historical record of the work of California artists and curators.

Sherin Guirguis
Egyptian Feminist Doria Shatik
Craft & Folk Art Museum, Los Angeles
2018, 2017
Curated by
Suzanne Isken, Executive Director, and Holly Jerger, Curator, of the Craft & Folk Art Museum

Fellows of Contemporary Art are giving the  2018 Curators Award of $60,000  to Suzanne Isken, Executive Director, and Holly Jerger, Curator, of the Craft & Folk Art Museum for their exhibition of the artist Sherin Guirguis.

Guirguis is a mid-career artist who was born in 1974 in Luxor, Egypt. She immigrated to the U.S. in 1988. Her BA in Painting and Sculpture is from UC Santa Barbara, and her MFA in Painting is from the University of Nevada at Las Vegas.

Guirguis' exhibition will entail a combination of two-dimensional work and sculpture. Her research on an Egyptian feminist philosopher, writer, and editor, Doria Shatik, who died in 1975, will be the foundation of this exhibition. Shaftik started a radical feminist movement in Egypt that contributed to Egyptian women winning the right to vote in 1956.

An example of Sherin Guirguis sculpture, shown below, is on view in L.A. Exuberance: New Gifts by Artists at LACMA until April 2, on the third floor of the Broad building.

Untitled (el sokareya) , 2013 plywood (photo Judith Tuch)

Another example of Ms. Guirgus's work is included in the current Desert X exhibition in the Coachella Valley.  As described in "Desert X’ Treats Arid Space as a Rich Canvas" (NYT February 25, 2017)

"At another trailhead further west, near the base of the Whitewater Preserve, the Los Angeles-based Sherin Guirguis has built a domed, earthen sculpture like the pigeon towers popular in Egypt, where she grew up. The towers are typically used to breed the birds for food or sport (and, more rarely, for espionage missions). Her sculpture has niches for birds, but she doesn’t expect any to actually use it; she wants viewers to wonder about its significance.

Sherin Guirguis’s “One I Call” includes niches for birds. Emily Berl for The New York Times

“I hear people say the desert is a blank canvas,” she said. “Actually it’s full of life and full of histories; we just don’t value them enough. I wanted to reach into the history of these desert communities that are often marginalized.”
The Whitewater Preserve has a “carry-in, carry-out” policy for garbage. Ms. Guirguis has followed this approach for her work, too, using soil and clay from a nearby quarry and mountain spring water. The only imported material was jute, in the form of long sandbags she packed with soil to make the tower’s building blocks.
Chances are the work will erode a bit because of rain and wind. At the end of the project, she said, she will hose down the surviving structure and take away the sandbags, so all that remains is a pile of earth.

Toba Khedoori
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
September 20, 2016 to March 19, 2017, 2016
Curated by
Franklin Sirmans, Organizer
Catalogue Essays by
Ann Goldstein, Lucas Zwirner, Franklin Sirmans,Aruna D'Souza, catalogue poem: Brenda Shaughnessy
Traveled to:
Pérez Art Museum, Miami Florida April 20-September 24, 2017

Supported by a $65,000 award from Fellows of Contemporary Art, LACMA has organized  a chronological survey of Toba Khedoori's work spanning more than 20 years.  The show runs until March 19, 2017 and can be seen on the second floor of the Broad building.

The exhibition begins with the artist's strongest work, described by organizer Franklin Sirmans as  monumental miniatures; minutely detailed drawings/paintings on gigantic pieces of paper over 20 feet wide that the artist prepared first with a coat of wax and then added graphic drawings.

The show ends with "downsized"paintings/drawings  which, in this writer's opinion,  seem to lose the tension of the earlier work.  Further, the later work seems to appropriate from other artists.  For example, Khedoori's Untitled (leaves branches) evokes equally meticulous painters such as Astrid Preston.

Jahn Yau summarized the differences between Khedoori's early versus later work  in a 2012 essay "Neither Here nor There,"

... it seems to me that in downsizing her work, the artist lost an important tension, which is the space that is neither here nor there but nevertheless served as a site for her mundane things: a fireplace; a fenced enclosure; rows and rows of auditorium seats. The vast (and possibly cosmic) space enabled an ordinary wooden chair and table, for example, to gain a veneer of abjectness.  Plainness and repetition became heightened states.

The LACMA exhibition includes more than 25 works and was organized by Mr.  Sirmans, Director of the Pérez Art Museum Miami and formerly curator and department head of contemporary art at LACMA, with Christine Y. Kim, associate curator of contemporary art at LACMA.

A 150 page catalogue Toba Khedoori acknowledging Fellows support on the title page and a listing FOCA board members at the end, accompanies the exhibit and will be distributed to Fellows.

Shown below are photos from LACMA's walkthrough for Fellows on September 20, 2016.

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JOHN ALTOON
Special Exhibitions
LACMA
June 8, 2014 - September 14, , 2014
Curated by
Carol Eliel
Catalogue Essays by
Carol Eliel and artists Paul McCarthy, Monica Majoli, Laura Owens, Monique Prieto, and Barbara T. Smith
Traveled to:
Rose Art Museum at Brandeis University

Fellows of Contemporary Art awarded a $50,000 Special Exhibitions Award to Carol Eliel, Curator of Modern Art at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Ms Eliel was selected for this award for her exhibition JOHN ALTOON which opened at LACMA on June 8, 2014.

JOHN ALTOON was the first major retrospective devoted to this under-known, yet influential artist whose brief career unfolded largely in Southern California from the mid‑1950s until his unexpected death in 1969 at age 43. The exhibition considered Altoon’s career through both paintings and drawings, which formed an integral part of his practice, and included approximately 70 works. In contrast to earlier, smaller shows that examined Altoon in the context of Abstract Expressionism, this retrospective not only considered Altoon’s relationship to his predecessors and his peers but also investigated his ongoing influence on and relationship to later generations of artists.

JOHN ALTOON was on view at LACMA from June 8, 2014 through September 14, 2014. The exhibition traveled to the Rose Art Museum at Brandeis University and was view there from October 8, 2014 to December 21, 2014.

The exhibition was organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the Rose Art Museum at Brandeis University. The exhibition was supported in part by the Fellows of Contemporary Art and the Kimmel Family. Additional support was provided by the Clinton Hill/Allen Tran Foundation.

Two Schools of Cool
Orange County Museum of Art (OCMA), Newport Beach, California
October 9 - January 22, 2011
Curated by
Sarah Bancroft
Catalogue Essays by
Sarah Bancroft

Two Schools of Cool reexamines a group of artists, pairing elder statesmen of cool with artists from a new generation that mostly emerged in Los Angeles beginning in 2000. The exhibition provides the two generations with space to explore, experiment, and provoke through collaborative projects. The exhibition is a lab that espouses similarities between the generations as well as changes and shifts in the art world over the last four decades, including the increasing prominence of female artists, distinct methodologies, and the use of new technologies. The culminating exhibition presents five distinct installations, each conceived, developed, and created by a pair of artists.

The collaborating artist teams are: John Baldessari and Shana Lutker, Llyn Foulkes and Stanya Kahn, George Herms and Sarah Cain, Allen Ruppersberg and Amanda Ross-Ho, and Robert Williams and Ed Moses. The exhibition will include select public programs during the run of the exhibition, including artist talks, performances and workshops.

The mixed media projects, developed in the months leading up to the exhibition, include a video and sound installation, a participatory installation involving choice and selection; a site specific installation incorporating wall painting, found objects, assemblage, paintings, text and works on paper; an artist- curated installation of paintings in which each artist will provide a critique of the other’s practice in the form of wall text as well as a public dialogue. The installations incorporate elements contributed by each artist, and are discrete collaborative projects as determined and outlined together by the pair.

Superficiality and Superexcrescence
Surface & Identity in Recent California Art
Otis Ben Maltz Gallery
June 27 - September 12, 2009
Curated by
Chris Bedford, Kristina Newhouse and Jennifer Wulffson
Catalogue Essays by
John Welchman

Superficiality and Superexcrescence features work by Amy Adler, Rebecca Campbell, Marcelino Gonçalves, Lia Halloran, Salomón Huerta, Elliott Hundley, Kurt Kauper, Elad Lassry, Blue McRight, Joel Morrison, Kori Newkirk, Tia Pulitzer, and Catherine Sullivan. Conceived in opposition to the hard and fast interior/exterior dialectic that cultural theorists like Frederic Jameson have used to contrast the modern and postmodern eras, this exhibition offers a close examination of the work of thirteen LA-based artists who are variously committed to the notion that deep cultural meaning inhabits—as code, nuance, and implication—the outer husk of the people and objects that populate our day-to-day lives, remaking superficiality not as a condition to be resisted, but rather one to be analyzed and manipulated. For these artists, surface and substance are not opposed properties, but equally present. Accordingly, each of these artists focuses on what is latent over what is manifest, on implication over demonstration, and on faint whispers over loud, declarative statements, not with the aim of privileging appearance over essence, but rather to suggest that appearance and essence co-mingle in the surfaces that surround us to generate cultural meaning.

Kori Newkirk: 1997-2007
The Studio Museum in Harlem
November 14 - March 9, 2007
Curated by
Thelma Golden
Catalogue Essays by
Thelma Golden, Huey Copeland, Deborah Willis & Dominic Molon
Traveled to:
Traveled to the Pasadena Museum of California Art

Kori Newkirk (b. 1970) is a celebrated multidisciplinary artist whose conceptual practice is based on transforming modest materials into loaded signifiers that question both cultural and aesthetic notions of beauty. Newkirk elegantly blends medium and message-using photographs, wax, hair pomade, beads and neon lights-to forge a new paradigm in art practice. This survey exhibition presents work produced since Newkirk received his MFA from the University of California at Irvine, includes a site-specific project and illustrates how interrelated strands of his practice have converged and developed over time.

THING
New Sculpture From Los Angeles
Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, California
February 6 - June 5 , 2005
Curated by
James Elaine, Aimee Chang, and Christopher Miles
Catalogue Essays by
Christopher Miles

Including work by 20 Los-Angeles-based artists, THING uncovers the most innovative contemporary sculpture from the up-and-coming generation. Probing the formal and conceptual trajectories of sculpture in Los Angeles, THING includes a broad selection of works and addresses a wide range of sculptural practices, attempting to make sense of new materials, forms, methods, and concerns of this promising generation of emerging Angeleno artists. THING offers viewers a chance to examine how the vital and provocative sculpture being produced by L.A.’s younger set extends local traditions and lineages, and also taps into and shapes broader cultural streams. As Los Angeles has become a defining force in international contemporary art, the exhibition, though focusing on Los Angeles, provides a compelling view into the state of sculpture today.

Artists included in the exhibition are: Lauren Bon, Jedediah Caesar, Kate Costello, Krysten Cunningham, Hannah Greely, Taft Green, Matt Johnson, Aragna Ker, Olga Koumoundouros, Renee Lotenero, Nathan Mabry, Rodney McMillian, Chuck Moffit, Kristen Morgin, Joel Morrison, Micahel O’Malley, Kaz Oshiro, Andy Ouchi, Lara Schnitiger, Mindy Shapero

Topographies
McBean Galleries, San Francisco Art Institute
March 19 - May 8 , 2004
Curated by
Karen Moss
Catalogue Essays by
Karen Moss, Jeannene Przyblyski, Steve Dietz, and Noah Snyder
Traveled to:
Traveled to the Pasadena Museum of California Art

Topographies features representations that reference terrains ranging from the rural to the aural to the wholly imaginary. Sharing an interest in strategies of mapping, marking, and delineating specific sites, the artists of Topographies employ a wide range of artistic forms to highly individualized ends, including photography, drawing, painting, sculpture, installation, public intervention, video, and site specific work.

The exhibition includes work by John Baldessari, Allan Kaprow, Ed Ruscha, Charbel Ackermann, Jessica Bronson, Bull.Miletic, Ingrid Calame, Simon Evans, David Hinman, Charles La Belle, Young Kim, Sabina Ott, Rigo 23, Lordy Rodriguez, John Roloff, Adam Ross, San Francisco Bureau of Urban Secrets (led by SFAI faculty Jeannene Przyblyski), Susan Silton, Alex Slade, Shirley Tse, Tam Van Tran, and Anna Von Mertens.

George Stone: Probabilities
Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery, Barnsdall Art Park, Los Angeles, California
September 9 - November 16 , 2003
Curated by
Carole Ann Klonarides
Catalogue Essays by
Norman M. Klein, Carole Ann Klonairdes, Peter Lunenfeld, Ralph Rugoff and Judith Vida Spence

The exhibition featured eight installations re-created by Stone: PACER (1979); CIRCLE OF DECEIT (The Last Game) and THE MEDIUM (1983-1984); FAULT LINE (1986-88); SPIRIT FINDER (1987); IN THE LINE OF FIRE (1988); DOUBLECROSS (1990); MEN AND WOMEN (1991); UNKNOWN, UNWANTED, UNCONSCIOUS, UNTITLED (1993); and a new work PAPARAZZI GARDEN (2002-03), that gives voice to Stone’s concern with our lack of privacy within a surveillance-laden technological environment.

Whiteness, A Wayward Construction
Laguna Art Museum, Laguna Beach, California
March 23 - June 6 , 2003
Curated by
Tyler Stallings
Catalogue Essays by
Ken Gonzales-Day, Amelia Jones and David R. Roediger

Whiteness is a group exhibition of 29 artists working in various media who explore representations of whiteness and the image of the white in the public imagination. The underlying assumption in the exhibit is that everyone in the United States is constructed in the political imagination as a racial subject. Following this notion, the exhibit then considers whiteness in order to make visible what often seems invisible when cast as the norm. In order to dissuade this tendency towards disembodiment and invisibility, this exhibit attempts to locate and embody whiteness in a particular experience of being white. The exhibit is subdivided into three categories which overlap on one another, and are meant to suggest a movement from unawareness to recognition to immersion/emersion: White Out explores the idea of white people not seeing themselves, Mirror, Mirror… explores the concept of whites seeing themselves and how others see them, and The Graying of Whiteness presents artists who are mixing up the issues and present a “third way” of looking.

Artists: Kavin Buck, James Casebere, Emilio Cueto, Kim Dingle, Peter Edlund, John Feodorov, Kelsey Fernkopf, Mark Steven Greenfield, Joseph Havel, Mike Kelley, Byron Kim, Clifford Lecuyer, Richard A. Lou, Daniel Joseph Martinez, Myrella Moses, Tim Oberst, Adrian Piper, Ernesto Pujol, Erika Rothenberg, Kammy Roulner, Lezley Saar, Robert J. Sanchez, Andres Serrano, Richard Shelton, Kyungmi Shin, Gary Simmons, Travis Somerville, Kara Walker and Millie Wilson

On Wanting to Grow Horns: The Little Theatre of Tom Knechtel
Ben Maltz Gallery, Otis College of Art and Design, Los Angeles, California
November 9 - February 15 , 2002
Curated by
Anne Ayres
Catalogue Essays by
Anne Ayres, Ron Platt, Benjamin Weissman, poems by Amy Gerstler and Richard Howard
Traveled to:
Traveled to Weatherspoon Art Museum, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, North Carolina; The Contemporary Art Museum, Honolulu, Hawaii; Henry Art Gallery, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington

he exhibition On Wanting to Grow Horns: the Little Theater of Tom Knechtel is a mid-career retrospective of one of Los Angeles’ most original voices in painting and drawing. Comprised of twenty-five oil paintings and approximately seventy works on paper representing the artist’s work from 1976 to 2001, On Wanting to Grow Horns: the Little Theater of Tom Knechtel presents a rare opportunity to trace the evolution and exploration of Knechtel’s wide range of media and subject matter.

Michael Brewster: See Hear Now
A Sonic Drawing and Five Acoustic Sculptures
Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions, Los Angeles, California
February 16 - April 20 , 2002
Curated by
Irene Tsatsos
Catalogue Essays by
Irene Tsatsos, Peter Clothier, Barry Schwabsky, Brandon Labelle and Michael Brewster

Along with artists involved in the Light and Space Movement in California in the 1960’s, Michael Brewster became interested in exploring the boundaries of phenomenological experience as a means of providing the viewer with a cognitive awareness of how the process of our perceptions conditions our imaginations and our understandings of an art work. Using sound to create a perceptual field as opposed to an object also established a kind of secondary, imaginary visual experience as well as the primary aural one. Instead of walking around a sculptural object, the experience of Brewster’s work requires us to move through the sound as a sculptural material, one that allows us to explore it from within. His work establishes a unique dynamic between viewer and artwork. For his project at LACE, Michael Brewster constructed a sound chamber in which he presented five different "acoustic sculptures" which last four to six minutes each, operated from a touch screen.

Flight Patterns
Museum of Contemporary Art at the Geffen
November 12 - February 11 , 2000
Curated by
Cornelia H. Butler
Catalogue Essays by
Cornelia H. Butler, Lee Weng Choy, and Francis Pound

In the wake of several exhibitions exploring the history of surrealist inspired work in California and exhibitions such as Proof which highlighted the history of the documentary image in California, Flight Patterns investigates contemporary artists of the Pacific Rim whose work addresses the specific topographic condition and experience of living in this geographically and geopolitically dynamic region. The exhibition follows a tradition of investigations into the history of representation of the landscape of the west as the exotic frontier. Focussing primarily on Los Angeles and California based artists, or artists who have made significant bodies of work in this region, the exhibition also includes artists from the countries of Australia, New Zealand, Korea, and Thailand. Highlighting the diversity of approaches – formal photographic treatments of the landscape, conceptually based works which mine the territory of the region’s rich cultural history and works which strategically address the changing condition of life in one of the most environmentally charged areas on the planet – the exhibition includes both new works by emerging artists as well as significant works by more established artists whose work has historically addressed the themes.

Artists: Laurence Aberhart, Doug Aitken, Center for Land Use Interpretation, Miles Coolidge, Caryl Davis, Christina Fernandez, Simryn Gill, Rodney Graham, Anthony Hernandez, Gavin Hipkins, Igloolik Isuma Productions, Tim Johnson, Rachel Khedoori, Roy Kiyooka, David Lamelas, Simon Leung, Tracey Moffatt, Lee Mullican, Paul Outerbridge, Michael Parekowhai, Allan Sekula, Yuk King Tan and Glen Wilson

Eleanor Antin
Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, CA
May 23 - August 23 , 1999
Curated by
Howard Fox
Catalogue Essays by
Lisa Bloom and Howard Fox

Eleanor Antin is a member of the first generation of American feminist artists to emerge in the 1960s and is also one of the pioneering “intermedia? artists. Over the three decades of her career, Antin has produced numerous highly acclaimed series of postcard art, photographic narratives, literary works, performances, videotapes, short and feature-length movies, and what she calls “filmic installations? – theatrical stage sets that can be entered and explored and in which are embedded films, usually rear-screen projections, where stories unfold. Antin has had literally dozens of solo exhibitions in both museums and commercial galleries and has been included in countless group exhibitions; curiously there has not been a survey of her art in all its inventive forms. Now, as critics, curators, and art historians begin to reassess the achievements of the “post-modern? era that began with conceptual art, it is appropriate for an in-depth examination of the art of Eleanor Antin, one of the period’s early innovators and veteran practitioners. This exhibition brought together for the first time all of Antin’s major works, many of which are multi-part and multi-media.

Bruce and Norman Yonemoto: Memory, Matter, and Modern Romance
Japanese American National Museum, Los Angeles, CA
January 23 - July 4 , 1999
Curated by
Karin Higa
Catalogue Essays by
Ian Buruma, Karin Higa, Timothy Martin, and Bruce and Norman Yonemoto

Hollywood and the language of the media provide the critical backdrop for the work of Bruce and Norman Yonemoto. Their work in video, installation and performance has consistently explored the tensions in representation, the fabrication of memory, and the persistence of romance in the construction of self and group identity. The Yonemotos alternately employ a droll wit and incisive criticality to explore the seduction of filmic representation, whether it be a Hollywood narrative, ethnographer’s tool or home movie. The intention in these projects is not to condemn the media, but to thoughtfully analyze, question and interrogate the implicit assumptions presumed by such representations as well as turn the focus back onto our own desires. Memory, matter and Modern Romance will survey the Yonemotos’ work from 1976 to the present, providing a comprehensive analysis of their work in all its forms, while situating their projects within the larger discussions of cultural identity and the artistic milieu of Southern California.

Access All Areas
Japanese American Community Cultural and Community Center, Los Angeles, California
June 6 - July 26 , 1998
Curated by
Pilar Perez

A discourse in cultural representation, art, and new media exhibited simultaneously on the Internet and billboards across the city of Los Angeles.

Artists: Glenn Kaino, Betty Lee, Joseph Sanatarromana and Erika Suderburg

Scene of the Crime
UCLA at the Arm and Hammer Museum of Art and Cultural Center, Los Angeles, California
July 22 - October 5 , 1997
Curated by
Ralph Rugoff
Catalogue Essays by
Ralph Rugoff, Peter Wollen and Anthony Vidler

Artists: Terry Allen, D. L. Alvarez, John Baldessari, Lewis Baltz, Uta Barth
Nayland Blake, Chris Burden, Vija Celmins, Bruce Conner, Eileen Cowin, John Divola, Sam Durant, Vincent Fecteau, Bob Flanagan and Sheree Rose, Janet Fries, David Hammons, Lyle Ashton Harris, Richard Hawkins, Anthony Hernandez, Mike Kelley, Ed Kienholz and Nancy Reddin Kienholz, Barry La Va, Sharon Lockhart, James Luna, Monica Majoli, Mike Mandel/Larry Sultan, Paul McCarthy, Richard Misrach, Bruce Nauman, Robert Overby, Nancy Reese, Michelle Rolman, Edward Ruscha, Alexis Smith, George Stone and Jeffrey Vallance

Llyn Foulkes: Between a Rock and a Hard Place
Laguna Art Museum, Laguna Beach, California
October 27 - January 21 , 1995
Curated by
Marilu Knode
Catalogue Essays by
Rosetta Brooks and Marilu Knode
Traveled to:
Traveled to The Contemporary Art Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, The Oakland Museum, Oakland, California, Palm Springs Desert Museum, Palm Springs, California
Plane / Structures
Otis Art Institute Gallery, Los Angeles, California
September 10 - November 5 , 1994
Curated by
David Pagel
Catalogue Essays by
David Pagel, Dave Hickey, and Joe Scanlan
Traveled to:
Traveled to: The Renaissance Society at the University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Center for the Arts, Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut Nevada Institute for Contemporary Art, Las Vegas, Nevada

Artists: Fandra Chang, Mary Corse, Caren Furbeyre, Jeremy Gilbert-Rolfe, James Hayward, Maxwell Hendler, Scot Heywood, Linda Hudson, Liz Larner, John M. Miller, James Richards, Roy Thurston, Carolee Toon, Alan Wayne, Jonathan White, Pae White

Kim Abeles: Encyclopedia Persona
A 15-Year Survey
Santa Monica Museum of Art, Santa Monica, California
September 23 - December 6 , 1993
Curated by
Karen Moss
Catalogue Essays by
Kim Abeles, Lucinda Barnes and Karen Moss
Traveled to:
Traveled to Fresno Art Museum, Fresno, California, Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art, Winston-Salem, North Carolina Forum, St. Louis, Missouri, USIA Arts America Program organized a tour through Latin America for 1996: National Museum of Fine Arts, Santiago Complejo Cultural Recoleta, Buenos Aires Museum of Modern Art, Rio de Janeiro Museum of Modern Art, Caracas
Proof
Los Angeles Art and the Photograph, 1960-1980
Laguna Art Museum, Laguna Beach, California
October 31 - January 17 , 1992
Curated by
Charles Demarais
Catalogue Essays by
Charles Demarais
Traveled to:
Traveled to DeCordova Museum and Sculpture Park, Lincoln Park, Lincoln, Massachusetts, The Friends of Photography, Ansel Adams Center, San Francisco, California, Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, Montgomery, Alabama, Tampa Museum of Art, Tampa, Florida, Des Moines Art Center, Des Moines, Iowa

Artists: Terry Allen, Eleanor Antin, John Baldessari, Wallace Berman, George Blakely, Ellen Brooks, Gillian Brown, Gary Burns, Jack Butler, Carl Cheng, Eileen Cowin, Robert Cummings, Darryl Curran, Lou Brown DiGiulio, John Divola, Robert Fichter, Robert Flick, Llyn Foulkes, Vida Freeman, Judith Golden, Susan Haller, Robert Heinecken, George Herms, Dennis Hopper, Suda House, Douglas Huebler, Steve Kahn, Barbara Kasten, Edward Kienholz, Ellen Land-Weber, Victor Landweber, Paul McCarthy, Jerry McMillan, Virgil Mirano, Stanley Mock, Susan Rankaitas, Allen Ruppersberg, Edward Ruscha, Ilene Segalove, Allan Sekula, Kenneth Shorr, Alexis Smith, Michael Stone, Todd Walker and William Wegman

Roland Reiss: A Seventeen Year Survey
Los Angeles County Municipal Art Gallery, Los Angeles, California
November 19 - January 19 , 1991
Curated by
Betty Ann Brown
Catalogue Essays by
Betty Ann Brown, Merle Schipper, Buzz Spector, Richard Smith and Robert Dawidoff
Traveled to:
Traveled to University of Arizona Museum of Art, Tucson, Arizona, The Neuberger Museum of Art, State University of New York at Purchase, Purchase, New York, Palm Springs Desert Museum, Palm Springs, California
Facing the Finish
Some Recent California Art
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, California
September 20 - December 1 , 1991
Curated by
John Caldwell and Robert Riley
Catalogue Essays by
John Caldwell and Robert Riley
Traveled to:
Traveled to Santa Barbara Contemporary Arts Forum, Santa Barbara, California, Art Center College of Design, Pasadena, California

Artists: Nayland Blake, Jerome Caja, Jim Campbell, David Kremers, Rachel Lachowicz, James Luna, Jorge Pardo, Sarah Seager, Christopher Williams and Millie Wilson

Lita Albuquerque: Reflections
Santa Monica Museum of Art, Santa Monica, California
January 19 - April 1 , 1990
Curated by
Henry Hopkins
Catalogue Essays by
Jan Butterfield and Henry Hopkins
The Pasadena Armory Show 1989
The Armory Center for the Arts, Pasadena, California
November 2 - January 31 , 1989
Curated by
Noel Korten
Catalogue Essays by
Dave Hickey and Noel Korten

Artists: Carole Caroompas, Karen Carson, Michael Davis, James Doolin, Scott Grieger, Raul Guerrero, William Leavitt, Jerry McMillan, Margit Omar, John Outterbridge, Ann Page and John ValadezArtists: Carole Caroompas, Karen Carson, Michael Davis, James Doolin, Scott Grieger, Raul Guerrero, William Leavitt, Jerry McMillan, Margit Omar, John Outterbridge, Ann Page and John Valadez

Jud Fine
La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art, La Jolla, California
August 19 - October 2 , 1988
Curated by
Ronald J. Onorato
Catalogue Essays by
Ronald J. Onorato and Madeleine Grynsztejn
Traveled to:
Traveled to de Saisset Museum, Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, California
Perpetual Motion
Santa Barbara Museum of Art, Santa Barbara, California
November 17 - January 24 , 1987
Curated by
Betty Turnball
Catalogue Essays by
Betty Turnball

Artists: Karen Carson, Margaret Nielsen, John Rogers and Tom Wudl

Variations III
Emerging Artists in Southern California
Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions
April 22 - May 31 , 1987
Curated by
Melinda Wortz
Catalogue Essays by
Melinda Wortz
Traveled to:
Traveled to Fine Arts Gallery, University of California, Irvine, California, Art Gallery, California State University, Northridge, California

Artists: Alvaro Asturias/ John Castagna, Hildegarde Duane/ David Lamelas, Tom Knechtel, Joyce Lightbody, Julie Medwedeff, Ihnsoon Nam, Ed Nunnery, Patti Podesta, Deborah Small, Rena Small and Linda Ann Stark

William Brice
The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, California
September 1 - October 19 , 1986
Curated by
Julia Brown Turrell
Catalogue Essays by
Richard Armstrong
Traveled to:
Traveled to Grey Art Gallery and Study Center, New York University, New York
James Turrell
The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, California
November 13 - February 9 , 1985
Curated by
Julia Brown
Catalogue Essays by
Craig Adcock, Julia Brown, John Coplans, Edy de Wilde, Craig Hodgetts, Lucebert, Count Giuseppe Panza di Biumo, Jim Simmerman, James Turrell, Theordore F. Wolff
Sunshine and Shadow
Recent Painting in Southern California
Fisher Gallery, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
January 15 - February 23 , 1985
Curated by
Susan C. Larsen
Catalogue Essays by
Susan C. Larsen

Artists: Robert Ackerman, Richard Baker, William Brice, Karen Carson, Lois Colette, Ronald Davis, Richard Diebenkorn, John Eden, Llyn Foulkes, Charles Garabedian, Candice Gawne, Joe Goode, James Hayward, Charles Christopher Hill, Craig Kauffman, Gary Lang, Dan McCleary, Arnold Mesches, John M. Miller, Ed Moses, Margit Omar, Marc Pally, Pierre Picot, Peter Plagens, Luis Serrano, Reesey Shaw, Ernest Silva and Tom Wudl

Martha Alf Retrospective
Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery, Los Angeles, California
March 6 - April 1 , 1984
Curated by
Josine ianco-Starrels
Catalogue Essays by
Suzanne Muchnic
Traveled to:
Traveled to San Francisco Art Institute, San Francisco, California
Variations II: Seven Los Angeles Painters
Gallery at the Plaza, Security Pacific National Bank, Los Angeles, California
May 8 - June 30 , 1983
Curated by
Constance Mallinson
Catalogue Essays by
Constance Mallinson

Artists: Roy Dowell, Kim Hubbard, David Lawson, William Mahan, Janet McCloud, Richard Sedivy and Hye Sook

Changing Trends
Content and Style Twelve Southern California Painters
Laguna Beach Museum of Art, Laguna Beach, California
November 18 - January 3 , 1982
Curated by
Robert Smith
Catalogue Essays by
Francis Colpitt, Christopher Knight, Peter Plagens and Robert Smith
Traveled to:
Traveled to Los Angeles Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, California

Artists: Robert Ackerman, Caron Colvin, Scott Grieger, Marvin Harden, James Hayward, Ron Linden, John Miller, Pierre Picot, George Rodart, Don Suggs, David Trowbridge and Tom Wudl

Paul Wonner: Abstract Realist
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, California
October 1 - November 22 , 1981
Curated by
George W. Neubert
Catalogue Essays by
George W. Neubert
Traveled to:
Traveled to Marion Koogler McNay Art Institute, San Antonio, Texas, Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery, Los Angeles, California
Craig Kauffman Comprehensive Survey 1957-1980
La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art, La Jolla, California
March 14 - May 3 , 1981
Curated by
Robert McDonald
Catalogue Essays by
Robert McDonald
Traveled to:
Traveled to Elvehjem Museum of Art, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, Anderson Gallery, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richard, Virginia, The Oakland Museum, Oakland, California
Variations: Five Los Angeles Painters
University Art Galleries University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
October 20 - November 23 , 1980
Curated by
Donald J. Brewer and Bruce Hiles
Catalogue Essays by
Susan C. Larsen

Artists: Robert Ackerman, Ed Gilliam, George Rodart, Don Suggs and Norton Wisdom

Vija Celmins, A Survey Exhibition
Newport Harbor Art Museum, Newport Beach, California
December 15 - February 3 , 1979
Curated by
Betty Turnbull
Catalogue Essays by
Susan C. Larsen
Traveled to:
Traveled to The Arts Club of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, Hudson River Museum, Yonkers, New York, The Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC
Wallace Berman Retrospective
Otis Art Institute Gallery, Los Angeles, California
October 24 - November 25 , 1978
Curated by
Hal Glicksman
Catalogue Essays by
Robert Duncan, Walter Hopps, David Meltzer
Traveled to:
Traveled to Fort Worth Art Museum, Fort Worth, Texas, University Art Museum, University of California, Berkeley, California, Seattle Art Museum, Seattle, Washington
Unstretched Surfaces / Surfaces Libres
Los Angeles Institute of Contemporary Art, California
November 5 - December 16 , 1977
Curated by
Dr. Jean-Luc Bordeaux, Jean-Francois de Canchy and Alfred Pacquement
Catalogue Essays by
Jean-Luc Bordeaux, Alfred Pacquement and Pontus Hulten

Artists: Bernadette Bour, Jerrold Burchman, Thierry Delaroyere, Daniel Dezeuze, Christian Jaccard, Charles Christopher Hill, Allan McCollum, Jean-Michel Meurice, Jean-Pierre Pincemin, Peter Plagens, Tom Wudl and Richard Yokomi

Ed Moses Drawings 1958 – 1976
Frederick S. Wight Art Gallery, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California
July 13 - August 15, 1976
Curated by
Joseph Masheck
Catalogue Essays by
Joseph Masheck